INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION GUIDANCE AND COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

1 / 55
About This Presentation
Title:

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION GUIDANCE AND COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS

Description:

ET-ECE-10: Identify techniques for positive collaborative relationships with children. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:16
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 56
Provided by: swoodson
Learn more at: http://images.pcmac.org
Category:

less

Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION GUIDANCE AND COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS


1
INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATIONGUIDANCE AND COLLABORATIVE
RELATIONSHIPS
  • ET-ECE-10 Identify techniques for positive
    collaborative relationships with children.

2
Dealing with Disruptive Students In a Negative
Manner
  • http//player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?gui
    dAssetId06437FD2-8FE9-4D23-B6C1-AE18B69602D4blnF
    romSearch1productcodeUS

3
Dealing with Disruptive Students In a Positive
Manner
  • http//player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?gui
    dAssetId5011732E-A963-49D3-9D1D-332E2F8625A9blnF
    romSearch1productcodeUS

4
STANDARDET-ECE-10 Identify techniques for
positive collaborative relationships with
children.
  • Essential Questions
  • What are some philosophies of guidance and how do
    you select one that works well for you and the
    children in your care?
  • What techniques or guidance are available and
    how/when should these be used?
  • How do you differentiate between behaviors that
    fall within the range of normal and ones that
    are so problematic that you should seek help?
  • What factors affect childrens behavior?
  • How can you help children deal with and learn
    alternative behaviors such as aggression, biting,
    and shyness?
  • What behaviors do we expect of young children?
  • I Can Statements
  • Explain the components of effective communication
    with children.
  • Describe guidance approaches.
  • Determine developmentally appropriate practices
    that promote self-discipline.
  • Distinguish guidance strategies that promote
    positive behavior in children.
  • Determine the impact of physical punishment,
    threats and other negative guidance on children.
  • Analyze the impact of supervision on childrens
    learning.
  • Discuss principles for working with children
    displaying negative behavior.

5
STANDARDS
  • ET-ECE-10 Identify techniques for positive
    collaborative relationships with children.
  • 10.1 Explain the components of effective
    communication with children.
  • 10.2 Examine guidance approaches that include
    modeling, behavior modification, and cognitive
    and psychoanalytic approaches.
  • 10.3 Determine developmentally appropriate
    practices that promote self-discipline.
  • 10.4 Distinguish guidance strategies, including
    direct and indirect, that promote positive
    behavior in children.
  • 10.5 Determine the impact of physical punishment,
    threats and other negative guidance on children.
  • 10.6 Examine the impact of supervision on
    childrens learning.
  • 10.7 Discuss principles for working with children
    displaying negative behavior.

6
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
  • ELA11W1. The student produces writing that
    establishes an appropriate organizational
    structure, sets a context and engages the reader,
    maintains a coherent focus throughout, and
    signals a satisfying closure.
  • ELA11LSV1. The student participates in
    student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group
    verbal interactions.
  • NFACS4.5. Demonstrate techniques for positive
    collaborative relationships with children.

7
UNDERSTANDINGS GOALS
  • Enduring Understandings
  • Pro-social behaviors have to be nurtured in an
    atmosphere of acceptance.
  • According to Dreikurs, all childrens
    misbehaviors stem from one of four underlying
    goals attention, power, revenge, and
    inadequacy.
  • In humanistic psychology, the basic, underlying
    tenet is mutual respect and acceptance between
    adult and child.
  • Behavior management is based on the notion that
    childrens behavior can be changed by changing
    the environment.
  • An eclectic approach to guidance allows teachers
    to select those features of various approaches
    that work best for them.
  • The long-range goal is for children to learn
    constructive ways of solving problems.
  • Essential Questions
  • What are some philosophies of guidance and how do
    you select one that works well for you and the
    children in your care?
  • What techniques or guidance are available and how
    and when should these be used?
  • How do you differentiate between behaviors that
    fall within the range of normal and ones that
    are so problematic that you should seek help?
  • What factors affect childrens behavior?
  • How can you help children deal with and learn
    alternative behaviors such as aggression, biting,
    and shyness?
  • What behaviors do we expect of young children?

8
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • REMINDERS
  • Please ensure that Standard 13 notes are
    complete. OPEN NOTES TEST ON TOMORROW!!
  • All Cultural Diversity Posters, along with a
    sample craft, should be complete at this point.
  • All missing assignments must be completed by
    Friday, May 9th. There will be a 5 point
    deduction for each day that late assignments are
    not turned in.
  • WORK HARD TO COMPLETE TODAYS TASKS- LESS TALKING
    AND MORE FOCUS!!!!

EOCT AROUND THE CORNER. STUDY HARD!!
MISSING ASSIGNMENTS Field Experience (will be
made up through ECE Field Experience Make-up
assignment in Edmodo) Observation
Journals Sourcebook Organized Cultural
Diversity Poster
9
OPENING/ WORK PERIOD
  • Make-Up Day Housekeeping
  • -Complete missing assignments
  • Observation Journals
  • ( Field Experience/Job Shadow)
  • Performance Tasks
  • Notes (Sourcebook)
  • -Ensure that notes are complete for Standards 9a
    (Curriculum Instruction) , 10 (Guidance) , 13
    (Cultural Diversity)
  • -Ensure that Sourcebook is organized. Sourcebooks
    will be checked by May 16th !! (TEST GRADE!!)
  • -One Child Observation Study due by May 16th (See
    Edmodo for details on how to submit this
    assignment)
  • FINAL EXAM TODAY!!
  • Please ensure that your sourcebook is organized
    properly
  • Cover Page
  • Name
  • Period
  • 2013-2014
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Table of Contents
  • (2 pages- front only)
  • Section 1- Bell Ringers
  • Section 2- Notes
  • Section 3- Observation Journal

Important!!
  • Pay close attention to the completion of the
    following
  • Long Term One Child Study (Performance Task
    Test Grade!!)
  • Job Shadow (Journal, Packet, Cultural Diversity
    Lesson Plan)
  • Missing Observation Journals

10
OPENING- BELL RINGER
  • Permission Slips Due TODAY
  • For General Preparation and Study of the Play
  • Ghetto Detroit
  • Siamese twins Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • Neurosurgeon Neurology
  • Boston Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Paralysis Seizure
  • Resident Internship
  • Radiology Premed
  • Hemispherectomy Brain Tumor
  • Brain damage Mental Retardation

EOCT AROUND THE CORNER. STUDY HARD!!
MISSING ASSIGNMENTS
11
Sourcebook NotesET-ECE-10 Identify techniques
for positive collaborative relationships with
children.
  • Define the following terms
  • GUIDANCE
  • VERBAL ENVIRONMENT
  • CONSEQUENCE
  • TIME-OUT
  • I-MESSAGE
  • PROMPTING
  • REDIRECTING
  • MODELING
  • ACTIVE LISTENING
  • OVERSTIMULATED
  • FRUSTRATION
  • STRESS
  • FLEXIBLE LIMITS
  • ROUTINES
  • TRANSITIONS
  • AUDITORY SIGNALS
  • What are the four reasons for misbehavior?
  • What are the four goals of guidance?
  • What are the six types of guidance techniques?
  • Identify five ways to build self-discipline.
  • Identify the seven means of giving positive
    guidance.
  • Name five techniques for effective guidance.
  • Identify the six causes of behavioral problems.
  • Name five stressors that lead to behavior
    problems.

Copy the vocabulary terms from slide 6 in the
Standard 9a- Curriculum and Instruction
12
GUIDANCE AND COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPSECE
TERMINOLOGY
EDU-IECE-5. Students will demonstrate techniques
for positive collaborative relationships with
children.
  • GUIDANCE
  • VERBAL ENVIRONMENT
  • CONSEQUENCE
  • TIME-OUT
  • I-MESSAGE
  • PROMPTING
  • REDIRECTING
  • MODELING
  • ACTIVE LISTENING
  • OVERSTIMULATED
  • FRUSTRATION
  • STRESS
  • FLEXIBLE LIMITS
  • ROUTINES
  • TRANSITIONS
  • AUDITORY SIGNALS

13
GUIDANCE AND COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPSECE
TERMINOLOGY
  • GUIDANCE- Consists of direct and indirect actions
    used by an adult to help children develop
    appropriate behavior patterns.
  • VERBAL ENVIRONMENT- All the communication that
    occurs within the setting
  • CONSEQUENCE- A result that follows an action or
    behavior
  • TIME-OUT- A guidance technique that involves
    moving a child away from others for a short
    period of time.
  • I-MESSAGE-Tells the child how you feel about his
    or her behavior in a respectful manner.
  • PROMPTING-Making a verbal or nonverbal suggestion
    that requires a response.
  • REDIRECTING- divert, or turn, the childs
    attention in a different direction.
  • MODELING-Verbal or nonverbal actions by one
    person, setting an example for others.
  • ACTIVE LISTENING- You first listen to what the
    child is saying to you and then respond by
    repeating what was just said.
  • OVERSTIMULATED- Overexcited by many things
  • FRUSTRATION- Feelings of defeat or
    discouragement causing tension
  • STRESS-The bodys reaction to physical or
    emotional factors, often taking the form of
    tension
  • FLEXIBLE LIMITS- Limits that can be adapted to
    the needs of an individual or a a situation
  • ROUTINES-Everyday experiences
  • TRANSITIONS- Changing from one activity to
    another and/or moving from one place to another
  • AUDITORY SIGNALS- Informing children of a change
    through the use of sound

14
OpeningChoose one of the following
situationsRead the three situations below and
choose the problem that holds the most interest
for you.
  • Situation A Eleven-year old Claire writes
    remarkably well for her age. Her work shows a
    creativity and maturity of thought uncommon in
    elementary school. However, she is failing
    writing because she rarely turns in homework
    assignments and occasionally fails to complete
    classroom work. The work that she does complete
    is often riddled with spelling and punctuation
    errors and her handwriting is atrocious. You have
    talked with Claire and with her parents on
    several occasions. She claims that she simply
    forgets to finish her work.
  • Situation B Ten-year-old Kelly is an average
    student who seems to enjoy school and the social
    community of the classroom. Unfortunately, she
    enjoys the company of the other students so
    thoroughly that she cant stop talking to her
    neighbors, or even to the kids across the room.
    Her frequent disruptions are beginning to wear on
    you and to annoy many of the class members. Kelly
    is almost always good-natured and always agrees
    to try harder when you remind her to be quiet,
    but the problem only seems to be getting worse.
  • Situation C Eight-year-old Dustin is reading well
    below grade level. He attends resource, but he
    doesnt seem to be progressing. Dustin shies away
    from any classroom activity that involves
    readinghe looks terrified whenever you ask for a
    volunteer. You can see that he is beginning to
    retreat into himself. He doesnt interact much
    with the other children and he tries to melt into
    the background when you are calling on students.

15
Skinner's Operant Conditioning
  • His theory
  • Behaviorist- a theory of learning based upon the
    idea
  • that all behaviors are acquired through
    conditioning.
  • Classical conditioning is a technique used in
    behavioral training in which a naturally
    occurring stimulus is paired with a response.
    Next, a previously neutral stimulus is paired
    with the naturally occurring stimulus.
    Eventually, the previously neutral stimulus comes
    to evoke the response without the presence of the
    naturally occurring stimulus. The two elements
    are then known as the conditioned stimulus and
    the conditioned response.
  • Operant conditioning Operant conditioning
    (sometimes referred to as instrumental
    conditioning) is a method of learning that occurs
    through rewards and punishments for behavior.
    Through operant conditioning, an association is
    made between a behavior and a consequence for
    that behavior.
  • Imagine a rat in a cage. This is a special cage
    (called, in fact, a Skinner box) that has a bar
    or pedal on one wall that, when pressed, causes a
    little mechanism to release a foot pellet into
    the cage.  The rat is bouncing around the cage,
    doing whatever it is rats do, when he
    accidentally presses the bar and -- hey, presto!
    -- a food pellet falls into the cage! The operant
    is the behavior just prior to the reinforcer,
    which is the food pellet, of course.  In no time
    at all, the rat is furiously peddling away at the
    bar, hoarding his pile of pellets in the corner
    of the cage.
  • A behavior followed by a reinforcing stimulus
    results in an increased probability of that
    behavior occurring in the future.
  • What if you dont give the rat any more pellets? 
    Apparently, hes no fool, and after a few futile
    attempts, he stops his bar-pressing behavior. 
    This is called extinction of the operant
    behavior.

16
Create at least one solution for your problem
  • The real solution to any problem is likely to be
    as complex and interesting as the people
    involved. We do not mean to suggest that any one
    principle of educational psychology will provide
    an easy and definitive solution. However, for the
    purposes of this exercise, try to come of with at
    least one concrete idea, based on the principles
    of operant conditioning, that you can implement
    in an effort to solve your particular problem.
  • Be introspective, creative, and realistic.
    Consider the possible strengths and weaknesses of
    your solution. Discuss the implications of the
    solution that you have chosen and how it will
    potentially effect the student, the other
    students in the classroom and your own teaching.
    Discuss why you think you have chosen a sound
    solution and offer any insights you might have
    gathered from other teachers who have encountered
    similar situations. Be sure to include
    information about the theory on which you are
    basing your solution.

17
WHY DO CHILDREN MISBEHAVE?
  • A misbehaving child is a discouraged child.
    Why?

18
MISBEHAVIOR
  • Is based on a childs mistaken interpretation of
    how to find BELONGING SIGNIFICANCE!

19
4 GOALS OF MISTAKEN BEHAVIOR
  • 1. Attention
  • 2. Power
  • 3. Revenge
  • 4. Give-up

20
Reasons for Misbehavior
  • Stage of Growth the child is behaving in a
    normal manner for the stage of growth he/she is
    in power, attention, revenge, assumed inadequacy
    are normal
  • Unfulfilled Needs The childs needs are not
    being met and she/he is acting out in order to
    try to get his/her needs met.

21
Reasons for Misbehavior
  • Environment The child is uncomfortable in or
    does not understand his/her environment.
  • Doesnt know Better The child has not been
    taught the concept he/she is dealing with.

22
Goals of Guidance
  • To maintain childrens self-esteem and produce a
    desired change in behavior
  • To produce self-regulation and self-control
  • Teach them to direct their own behavior without
    outside control
  • To promote prosocial behaviors among children
  • Accepting and respecting others feelings
  • Verbally and physically comforting others
  • Expressing strong emotions in acceptable ways
  • Helping others
  • Cooperating with others in play and cleanup time
  • Sharing toys and materials
  • Sharing affection
  • Showing concern

23
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION WITH CHILDREN
  • Explain the components of effective communication
    with children.

24
Direct Guidance Communication Principles
  • Use simple language
  • Speak in a relaxed voice
  • Be positive
  • Offer choices with care
  • Encourage independence and cooperation
  • Be firm
  • Be consistent
  • Provide time for change
  • Consider feelings
  • Intervene when necessary

25
Teachers Discuss Attitude, Power, and Respect
  • http//player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?gui
    dAssetIdA59E7A23-4DB2-4BD5-B317-A0DE365DEFC4blnF
    romSearch1productcodeUS

26
GUIDANCE APPROACHES
  • Examine guidance approaches that include
    modeling, behavior modification, and cognitive
    and psychoanalytic approaches.

27
Types of Guidance Techniques
28
1. Natural and Logical Consequences
  • To make the punishment fit the crime.
  • Natural Consequences occur without
    interference, child can see the result of their
    choices
  • Logical Consequences should be relevant to the
    misbehavior
  • Example if Sally spills the paint, she must
    clean up the mess that is made
  • Cannot be used if the consequence will cause harm
    to self, others or property, or too far in the
    future.
  • Short in duration, not imposed in anger, provide
    opportunities for children to learn from their
    behavior

29
2. Positive Statements
  • Clearly states what is expected, then help them
    get started
  • When guiding children, phrase all requests in a
    positive manner
  • Talk to children at their eye level when giving
    directions
  • Example say, Lets walk to the blocks, rather
    than, Dont run to the blocks

30
3. Redirection
  • Children up to two years old can be easily
    distracted
  • Get him to focus on something else.
  • Example if he is angry at the blocks area, lead
    him to a different area of the room and introduce
    a different activity

31
4. Reverse Attention
  • When a childs behavior is inappropriate, focus
    on a child who is displaying the appropriate
    behavior and make a positive comment
  • Ignoring the negative, reinforcing the positive
  • If the first child changes his behavior, he
    should be immediately reinforced with a positive
    statement.

32
5. Limited Choices
  • Do not give him an unlimited choice unless he can
    really have what is chosen.
  • Only give choices that are available.
  • Example Do you want juice or water for a
    drink? rather than, What would you like to
    drink?

33
  • Use a place where there are no distractions or
    positive reinforcers

6. Time Out
  • When a child has disobeyed a rule, she will be
    sent to a predetermined place to distance herself
    from the problem and gain composure.
  • Should be a last option, limited use.

34
MODELINGPeople can learn by observing the
behavior is of others and the outcomes of those
behaviors.
  • How the environment reinforces and punishes
    modeling
  • People are often reinforced for modeling the
    behavior of others. Bandura suggested that
  • the environment also reinforces modeling. This is
    in several possible ways
  • 1, The observer is reinforced by the model. For
    example a student who changes dress to fit in
    with a certain group of students has a strong
    likelihood of being accepted and thus reinforced
    by that group.
  • 2. The observer is reinforced by a third person.
    The observer might be modeling the actions of
    someone else, for example, an outstanding class
    leader or student. The teacher notices this and
    compliments and praises the observer for modeling
    such behavior thus reinforcing that behavior.
  • 3. The imitated behavior itself leads to
    reinforcing consequences. Many behaviors that we
    learn from others produce satisfying or
    reinforcing results. For example, a student in my
    multimedia class could observe how the extra work
    a classmate does is fun. This student in turn
    would do the same extra work and also receive
    enjoyment.
  • 4. Consequences of the models behavior affect
    the observers behavior vicariously. This is known
    as vicarious reinforcement. This is where in the
    model is reinforced for a response and then the
    observer shows an increase in that same response.
    Bandura illustrated this by having students watch
    a film of a model hitting a inflated clown doll.
    One group of children saw the model being praised
    for such action. Without being reinforced, the
    group of children began to also hit the doll .

35
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
  • Behavior modification is based on the principles
    of operant conditioning, which were developed by
    American behaviorist B. F. Skinner (1904-1990).
    Skinner formulated the concept of operant
    conditioning, through which behavior could be
    shaped by reinforcement or lack of it.
  • In behavior modification, extinction eliminates
    the incentive for unwanted behavior by
    withholding the expected response. A widespread
    parenting technique based on extinction is the
    time-out, in which a child is separated from the
    group when he or she misbehaves. This technique
    removes the expected reward of parental
    attention.

36
COGNITIVE AND PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACHES
  • Cognitive-a learning theory of psychology that
    attempts to explain human behavior by
    understanding the thought processes. The
    assumption is that humans are logical beings that
    make the choices that make the most sense to
    them.
  • Pschoanalytic-The Conscious and Unconscious Mind
  • The Structure of the Mind According to Freud
  • The conscious mind includes everything that we
    are aware of. This is the aspect of our mental
    processing that we can think and talk about
    rationally. A part of this includes our memory,
    which is not always part of consciousness but can
    be retrieved easily at any time and brought into
    our awareness. Freud called this ordinary memory
    the preconscious.
  • The unconscious mind is a reservoir of feelings,
    thoughts, urges, and memories that outside of our
    conscious awareness. Most of the contents of the
    unconscious are unacceptable or unpleasant, such
    as feelings of pain, anxiety, or conflict.
    According to Freud, the unconscious continues to
    influence our behavior and experience, even
    though we are unaware of these underlying
    influences.

37
SELF-DISCIPLINE
  • Determine developmentally appropriate practices
    that promote self-discipline.

38
Developing Self-Discipline
  • http//player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?gui
    dAssetId49F1E57C-EA2B-4B1F-8457-6B483995B09AblnF
    romSearch1productcodeUS

39
BUILDING SELF-DISCIPLINE Classroom Management
Strategies
  • ! Increase positive interactions
  • ! Teacher organizes the daily schedule to reflect
    consistency and variety that are clearly focused
    and relevant to students.
  • ! Teacher establishes smooth, efficient classroom
    routines and procedures.
  • ! Teachers interact with all students in a
    positive, caring manner.
  • ! Teachers provide incentives/recognition/rewards
    to promote excellence.
  • ! Teachers set clear expectations/standards for
    classroom behavior and apply them fairly and
    consistently.
  • ! Teacher engages students in helping solve
    classroom problems.
  • ! Teacher moves around room for increased
    proximity to students.
  • ! Teacher visually scans the room for
    opportunities to acknowledge responsible
    behavior.

40
BUILDING SELF-DISCIPLINEClassroom Level
Interventions
  • ! Teacher places hand on students shoulder to
    remind and show support.
  • ! Teacher gives a verbal reminder to redirect
    behavior.
  • ! Teacher corrects behavior errors in a manner
    that provides instruction.
  • ! Teacher makes accommodations in areas of
    classroom to increase the students chance of
    success.
  • ! Teacher develops lessons to help students
    manage situations that cause difficulties..
  • ! Student is given quiet time to think about
    behavior.
  • ! Student and teacher discuss better choices.
  • ! Student is given time-out in the room.
  • ! Teacher and student develop a signal to help
    the student realize when he/she is engaging in
    inappropriate behavior.

41
GUIDANCE STRATEGIES
  • Distinguish guidance strategies, including direct
    and indirect, that promote positive behavior in
    children.

42
Positive Guidance
  • Consistency is the key to guidance
  • Self-discipline ability to direct ones own
    behavior
  • Attention is a powerful reinforcer to guide
    children they often misbehave for attention
  • Children may rebel when parents punish rather
    than discipline
  • Respond to aggressive behavior in non-aggressive
    ways
  • Example is a very effective way to teach
    children desired behavior
  • Discipline guidance which helps the child learn
    self-control

43
Techniques for Effective Guidance
  • Positive Verbal Environment
  • Positive Reinforcement
  • Using Consequences
  • Warning
  • Time-Out
  • I-Messages (behavior, feelings about, effects)
  • Effective Praise
  • Suggesting
  • Prompting
  • Persuading
  • Redirecting
  • Modeling
  • Listening
  • Ignoring
  • Encouraging

44
IMPACT OF NEGATIVE GUIDANCE
  • Determine the impact of negative guidance such as
    physical punishment and threats on children.

45
IMPACT OF NEGATIVE GUIDANCE
  • Social Behavior
  • Corporal punishment is associated with childrens
    aggression and other antisocial behavior (towards
    peers, siblings and adults).
  • Cognitive Effects
  • Social relationships such as early attachment to
    caregivers, friendships and collaborative
    learning between peers, and relationships between
    children and teachers, directly and indirectly
    influence childrens learning and motivation to
    learn.
  • Quality of ParentChild Relationships
  • Childrens secure attachment is fostered by warm,
    positive parentchild interactions and negatively
    associated with harshly punitive interactions.
  • Mental Health
  • Mental health problems are associated with
    physical punishment due to their being an outcome
    of the suppression of childhood anger associated
    with being hit by adults who children depend on
    for love and nurturance.
  • Moral Internalization
  • The major long-term goal of family discipline is
    to help children internalize the values and
    attitudes of society to guide their own behavior.
    Many adults want children to internalize such
    values, and they do not realize that the
    excessive use of power-assertive discipline in
    the absence of induction or explanation may have
    the opposite effect from what they wish to
    achieve.

46
IMPACT OF SUPERVISION
  • Examine the impact of supervision on childrens
    learning.

47
OBSERVATION
  • In your assigned class, observe adults dealing
    with childrens behavior. Make notes on the
    situations, the responses, and the outcomes.
    Analyze what you observed. Describe in writing
    two positive situations observed. What made them
    positive? Describe two negative situations.
    Recommend a positive approach that would have
    been more effective.

48
PURPOSE OF SUPERVISION
  • Actualize the student's learning to develop
    specific skills/competencies
  • Continually assess the student's progress toward
    their educational goals
  • Intervene in situations which are detrimental to
    the student's learning, e.g. harassment
  • Facilitate the student's learning
  • Assist the student in gaining critical thinking
    skills

49
PRINCIPLES FOR NEGATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • Apply principles for working with children
    displaying negative behavior.

50
Guidance Challenges
  • Causes of Behavioral Problems
  • Family Stressors That Lead to Behavior Problems
  • Overstimulation
  • Breaks in Routines
  • Noise
  • Waiting Time
  • Frustration
  • Physical Problems
  • Birth or adoption of sibling
  • Marriage, separation or divorce of parents
  • Custody, visitation, or support issues
  • Marriage of a parent
  • Parent entering the workforce
  • Family member moving in or out
  • Death
  • Moving (Self or Friend)
  • Loss of employment
  • Financial or legal problems
  • Substance abuse or addiction
  • Exposure to violence
  • Incarceration of family member
  • Becoming homeless
  • Arguing, fighting, or violence among family
    members
  • Abuse or neglect of self or family member

51
Flipped Student / Teacher
  • http//player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?gui
    dAssetId80FE743F-4FF6-4B16-8888-C75876BC2C2DblnF
    romSearch1productcodeUS

52
Guest speakers
  • EBD teacher, assistant principal in charge of
    discipline, school resource officer,
    administrator or counselor from alternative
    school.

The Guidance Game PowerPoint
53
GUIDANCE POWERPOINT
  • SPECIFICS
  • Must have at least 10 slides (not to include the
    cover slide)
  • Must include (appropriate) graphics
  • DUE BY FRIDAY 4/26/13
  • Post in Edmodo
  • Name-Period-Guidance PowerPoint
  • Cover Slide
  • Name of Person, Date of Birth, Birth Place,
  • Your Name, Course Title, Period
  • A TIME LINE Birth to Recent
  • The Early/Later Years What Guided their Life
  • How the Behavior Could Have Been Redirected/ How
    their Behavior Was Directed
  • What Could They Have Been or What did they
    Become? Where are They Now

54
GUIDANCE EXPERIMENTswoodson_at_sumterschools.org
  • Develop a Poster (Similar to theorist poster but
    smaller)
  • Description of Subject/Hypothesis
  • Current position/ accomplishments
  • Description of Demeanor
  • Evidence to Support Description of Demeanor
    (Theorist as support)
  • Analysis of Environment
    (Past and Current)
  • Signs of communication (possible lack)
  • Evidence of guidance approaches and strategies
  • Developmentally appropriate practices
  • Summary of Findings
  • Determine the impact of negative guidance
  • Actors/Actresses
  • Play a Role
  • Biography of the person
  • Analyzing Who is this person?
  • Become the person

55
Resources
  • http//tip.psychology.org/skinner.html
  • http//www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/proj/nru/opcond.
    html
  • http//chiron.valdosta.edu/whuitt/col/behsys/opera
    nt.html
Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
About PowerShow.com