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Curriculum Committee for Student Affairs and Technology Course

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Title: Curriculum Committee for Student Affairs and Technology Course


1
Curriculum Committee forStudent Affairs and
TechnologyCourse
  • Bernadette Henderson
  • Janice Lew
  • Tara Riall
  • Colleen Schmidt
  • Seattle University

2
Committee Objectives
  • Ascertain the necessity for a course about
    technology in student affairs
  • Establish a course that meets students graduate
    needs
  • Determine course objectives and anticipated
    learning outcomes
  • Develop a comprehensive syllabus for a 14 week
    course

3
History of Technology in Higher Education
  • The practice of student affairs must shift from
    providing resources in a campus environment to
    linking the learner with those resources wherever
    the learner is and whenever the resources are
    needed
  • (Upcraft and Goldsmith,Technological Changes in
    Student Affairs Administration, 2000)
  • Computers have provided new and improved outlets
    for communication and collaboration inside and
    outside of the classroom.

4
History of Technology in Higher Education, cont.
  • The advent of the computer has provided new
    methods for research and forced new methods of
    teaching to keep abreast of current trends in the
    ever-changing field of technology.
  • Student affairs units must be just as comfortable
    with technology as academic units within a given
    institution.

5
History of Technology in Higher Education, cont.
  • Technology is a presence that is re-shaping
    college campus, regardless of student affairs
    practitioners willingness to embrace it or fear
    its depletion of interpersonal relationships.
  • Empowerment can teach professionals to critique
    technology using the same theories that form the
    foundation of all student affairs work.
  • (Wallace, H., 2000)

6
History of Technology in Higher Education, cont.
  • 90 of college students use the web, for an
    average of almost six hours per week, primarily
    for educational purposes.
  • (Wallace, H., 2000)
  • Todays students have grown up tech-savvy, but
    there is a growing need to educate students on
    technological use within an educational setting.
    Technological incorporation can become the
    greatest tool of the student affairs profession
    for meeting the needs of todays students.

7
History of Technology in Higher Education, cont.
  • In the academic context, students want to
    conduct all institutional administrivia over
    the Internet, phone, desktop, or most convenient
    device twenty-four hours a day, seven days a
    week.
  • (Maughman, G.R., ___)

8
Future of Technology in Higher Education
  • Three focusi of technology in student affairs
  • Minimize administrative tasks
  • Create an unlimited educational environment
    unrestricted by classroom walls
  • Meet students where they are while maintaining
    personal service

9
Brief Overview of Technology in Student Affairs
Course
  • Rationale
  • Provide an updated introduction to Student
    Affairs focusing on areas of specialization,
    theories of Student Development and the impact of
    technology.
  • Format
  • Classroom modules (CM) allow cutting-edge
    technological presentations and community
    building among students.
  • Online modules (OM) increase comfort with
    technology through intense immersion

10
Brief Overview of Technology in Student Affairs
Course
  • Outcomes
  • Introduce students to the Student Affairs
    profession
  • Cultivate higher-level thinking skills
  • Technologically empower students
  • Increase dialogue among consortium students

11
Module 1 The Future is Here An Introduction to
the Technology in Student Affairs Course
  • Most students prefer using the Internet for
    research and recreation. They will spend
    countless hours searching and surfing. However,
    they may not completely understand the Internet's
    strengths and weaknesses as both a research tool
    and as a general source of information.
  • (Beck, S., 1997)

12
Module 1 The Future is Here Objectives
  • Review of modern technology (internet,
    videoconferencing, online course platform)
  • Overview of online and offline research
    (e-databases, online sources, internet validity,
    APA resources).
  • Application of technology via participation in
    e-networking, e-appearances, virtual tours
    (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, and Marra, 2003).

13
Module 1 The Future is Here Useful Links
  • http//library.albany.edu/internet/using A
    thorough introduction to the web including
    vocabulary, research tips, history and
    technological aspects of being online.
  • http//www.virtualsalt.com/evalu8it.htm Checklist
    of issues of concern when evaluating online
    sources.
  • http//www.duke.edu/de1/evaluate.html Dr.
    Everharts 0 to 100 point rubric for
    comprehensively evaluating websites.
  • http//trochim.human.cornell.edu/WebEval/webeval.h
    tm Scholarly research on website evaluation
    including an article on the internets impact on
    student learning.
  • http//lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/eval.html A
    user-friendly, example-rich, step-by-step walk
    through of website evaluation.

14
Module 1 The Future is Here Activity
This is an in-person session. Come meet your
classmates for the semester!
  • Observe demonstrations of the online course
    platform with specific attention paid to off-site
    connectivity and activity completion within the
    site.
  • Engage in a telefieldtrip to the nine other
    Consortium schools in the Learning Circle. Using
    e-networking, organize groups of five to six
    individual keypals (Jonnassen et al, 2003) for
    the Policy Symposium at least one member of
    each group must be from a different campus.

15
Module 1 The Future is Here Activity, cont.
  • Participate in the in-class overview of online
    research. Use at least two search engines and an
    online database to research technology and your
    preferred focus within Student Affairs (e.g.
    Admissions, Residence Life). Validate at least
    three websites and choose three journal articles
    from the electronic database to create an
    annotated bibliography of six sources. Be sure to
    include validity justification for your sources
    and define what aspects of your websites denote
    quality construction. APA format is required.
  • Post this to the campus class website for the
    Resource Collection before the next class session
    and be sure to review your peers submissions
    (Jonassen et al, 2003).

16
Module 1 The Future is Here Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Active engagement will immerse students in the
    technology that they will encounter in the course
    (videoconferencing, e-networking, internet
    searches) to emphasize real-life implications of
    technological advances in Student Affairs (Hird,
    2000).
  • Use of online and offline research skills,
    coupled with e-networking will develop the
    higher-level thinking skill of evaluation
    (Tileston, 2004) that allows for effective
    decisions on how to incorporate technology within
    various student affairs professional roles within
    a collaborative environment.
  • In-person meeting will provide a technological
    reference source for students via in-class
    demonstrations of the course platform and
    establish a sense of community at the start of
    the semester.

17
Module 2 Tech Savvy Students on the New Digital
Campus
  • There isa growing and increasingly computer
    literate student population with access to
    extensive computer resources, both on campus and
    increasingly at home. Self-service is
    empowering students to manage their own learning
    more actively.
  • (Cornford, J., and Pollock, N. 2003)

18
Module 2 Tech Savvy Students Objectives
  • Investigate technologys imprint on the 3J (just
    in time, just for me, just the right
    content) and 3R (right information, right
    time and place, right format) learning and
    information models (Langenberg, D.N., and Spicer,
    D.N., 2001).
  • Examine how technology is used to support, not
    replace, the student affairs enterprise
    (Langenberg, D.N., and Spicer, D.N., 2001).

19
Module 2 Tech Savvy Students Objectives, cont.
  • Understand the role of various technologies in
    providing integrated, personalized, asynchronous
    services to students.
  • Consider extended internal and external campus
    collaborations and partnerships with the advent
    of technologically-based student services.

20
Module 2 Tech Savvy Students Useful Links
  • http//www.wcet.info/resources/publications/guide/
    guide.htm A unique publication that showcases
    the University of Illinois online registration
    as part of the Western Cooperatives project
    guide facilitating online Student Affairs
    development.
  • www.internet2.edu A site that showcases the
    future of technology in education by coming full
    circle with the original intent of the internet
    as a collaborative tool for researchers.

21
Module 2 Tech Savvy Students Activity (this
is an online session)
  • Investigate the links listed above and search for
    three interactive websites you think would appeal
    to freshman, transfer, and non-traditional
    students respectively. Focus on interactive
    websites that are not educationally based.
  • Via email, be in touch with the Chief Student
    Affairs Officer at an institution of your choice
    to learn about the top three challenges and/or
    triumphs regarding technology and student affairs
    on their campus.
  • Also, email an undergraduate student (student
    organization contacts are a great start) to
    examine what tech savvy really means what are
    students doing with technology in all of its
    forms?

22
Module 2 Tech Savvy Students Activity, cont.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the Week
  • Carl Jung believed that behavior resulted from
    inborn tendencies or preferences (Jung, C.,
    1960). John Holland posited that behavior was a
    result of interactions between an individual and
    her environment (Holland, J., 1992). Do you
    believe that todays students were born with a
    love for technology or that the pervasive
    availability of technology is an environmental
    condition that has resulted in students ease
    with technology?
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    sharing your interactive websites, e-network
    contacts insights, and your own thoughts on this
    weeks Technology and Theory Intersection. Peer
    review your classmates contributions.

23
Module 3 Indirect Guidance Technological
Counseling and Academic Advising
  • Can effective advising take place for distance
    learners?
  • www.studentaffairs.com

24
Module 3 Indirect Guidance Objectives
  • Examine technology use (telementoring, online
    advising) in academic advising, peer mentoring,
    and counseling.
  • Delineate the pros and cons of indirect advising.
  • Gain hands-on experience with advising technology.

25
Module 3 Indirect Guidance Useful Links
  • http//www.psu.edu/ncta/ NACADA Professional
    advising association website link to their
    Commission on Technology in Advising which
    includes numerous links to innovative uses of
    technology in advising.
  • http//ezra.cornell.edu/ Touted as the first
    online helpdesk on the NACDA site, Uncle Ezra has
    been imitated on many college campuses as a
    first stop for many students seeking personal
    and academic advice and general student service
    information on a particular college campus.
  • http//www.seas.upenn.edu/epac/ Highly
    informative peer advising website at the
    University of Pennsylvania replete with college
    and major specific information and links to
    advisors.
  • http//www.ncsu.edu/advising_central/ An
    informative first step website that answers
    basic frequently asked questions and refers
    students with complex problems to the appropriate
    college personnel.
  • http//www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Spring_2001
    /advising.html Article about the pros of online
    advising for special populations (adult
    learners).
  • http//www.google.com/u/nacada?qadvisingonline

26
Module 3 Indirect Guidance Activity (this is
an online session)
  • Review the sites above. Explore
    non-website-based, technological approaches to
    academic advising (email registration,
    teleregistration).
  • Examine the benefits and detractors of not seeing
    an advisee face-to-face. Are there alternatives
    to non-verbal communication as indicators of
    hidden difficulties?

27
Module 3 Indirect Guidance Activity, cont.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the Week
  • The strength of the internetits ability to
    deliver information directly to individualsmay
    also be one of its greatest dangers. Students
    retreating to the isolation of their computers
    may avoidinvolvement, and instead be content
    with self-gratifying Internet involvement
    through discussion groups, aliases, and other
    links as replacements for face-to-face
    interactions (Treur, P., and Belote, L., 1997).
  • How might technology go beyond merely providing
    information to providing avenues for development
    in Chickerings third vector of interdependence
    (Chickering and Reisser, 1993)?
  • Post your website reviews and insights to the
    class discussion board.

28
Module 3 Indirect Guidance Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase technological comfort of
    students enrolled in the course.
  • Advising and Counseling will be thoroughly
    examined as facets of the overall Student Affairs
    profession.
  • Evaluation of student services that go beyond
    websites to incorporate technology will foster
    development of a technological framework and the
    higher-level thinking skills of evaluation
    (Tileston, D.W., 2004) that allow for effective
    decisions on the incorporation of technology
    within various Student Affairs roles.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a Student Development theoretical
    framework from which to evaluate the impact of
    technology on student affairs.

29
Module 4 Welcoming Students to the Digital
Campus Admissions, Financial Aid, and New
Student Programs
  • For students who have a negative experience
    navigating through an institutions website, this
    raises feelings of confusion and frustration
    before a student steps foot on a campus or speaks
    with anyone from the campus.
  • (Parsons, A., Herandez, J., 2003)

30
Module 4 Welcoming Students Objectives
  • Review ways colleges use technology to promote,
    implement, and evaluate new student programs.
  • Explore innovative uses of technology in
    admissions, orientation services and financial
    aid that go above and beyond the norm.

31
Module 4 Welcoming Students Links to Review
  • http//webcatalog.cc.utah.edu/orient/online/openin
    g_flash.html University of Utahs orientation
    website embraces the student with the college
    song. From initial registration, the University
    tracks the online progress of prospective
    students while incorporating a welcoming
    environment for internet explorers.
  • http//www.ramapo.edu/academics/firstYear/orientat
    ion.html Ramapo College incorporates the College
    web page into student orientation by posting the
    itinerary for upcoming events. The site informs
    students that they will receive continued
    services throughout the year and offers an
    introduction to other components of the
    first-year experience at Ramapo.
  • http//orientation.osu.edu/ Ohio State recognizes
    the needs of different types of students
    (transfers, traditional freshmen and winter
    starters) and personalizes site information for
    each contingency. Speaking directly to the
    student instead of an anonymous entity, the site
    distinctly notes what to expect from the
    orientation program.

32
Module 4 Welcoming Students Activity (this is
an online session)
  • Investigate the links listed above and search
    financial aid and orientation offices in your
    geographic area for ones you feel go above and
    beyond the norm. Also be in touch with a student
    affairs professional in financial aid or new
    student programming at an institution of your
    choice.
  • Reflect on your personal college experience to
    contrast ways colleges currently use technology
    to serve students as compared to how technology
    was used during your undergraduate years. Look
    beyond the internet to actual service providers
    that use technology in unique ways.

33
Module 4 Welcoming Students Activity, cont.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the Week
  • Evaluate how the frustrations students experience
    with ineffective technological efforts on the
    part of colleges could be detrimental to a
    student in Chickerings first vector of
    competency development (Chickering and Reisser,
    1993).
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    sharing results of your search for innovate
    service providers, the comparison exercise, your
    e-network contacts insights, and your own
    thoughts on this weeks Technology and Theory
    Intersection. Peer review your classmates
    contributions.

34
Module 4 Welcoming Students Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase comfort with technology.
    E-networking will continue to expand students
    contact bases for real-time consultations within
    their professional roles.
  • Financial Aid and Orientation will be examined as
    facets of the Student Affairs profession.

35
Module 4 Welcoming Students Learning Outcomes
and Rationales, cont.
  • Timeline comparisons of frontline new student
    services will develop the higher-level thinking
    skills of comparison and contrast (Tileston,
    2004) that allow for effective decisions on how
    to incorporate technology within various aspects
    of the Student Affairs profession.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a theoretical framework from which
    to evaluate the impact of technology on Student
    Development.

36
Module 5 Admissions and Enrollment Services
  • More and more, institutions are using technology
    as a means to attract more students to their
    campuses replacing some of the more traditional
    methods of marketing like print, radio and
    television ads
  • (Edwards, K., 2003)

37
Module 5 Admissions Enrollment Objectives
  • Examine technology in admissions and enrollment
    as an administrative and communicative tool.
  • Evaluate negative consequences of technology for
    admissions and enrollment services.
  • Interact with software tailored for enrollment
    management.

38
Module 5 Admissions Enrollment Links to
Review
  • http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Fall_2000/banni
    ng.htm A discussion regarding the proliferation
    of online virtual tours as the first area of
    contact for a majority of todays prospective
    college students. Emphasis is placed on the
    importance of a positive interaction with the
    Universitys web page.
  • https//www.applytexas.org/adappc/commonapp.wb
    Texas is one of many states that uses an online
    common application to streamline admissions.
  • http//www.ithaca.edu/tour/ Exemplary site
    incorporating slideshows, videos, 360 degree
    panoramas, and student tour guides for the
    virtual tour. The Ithaca Admissions site also has
    a My Ithaca feature that allows for extensive
    tracking, postcards and online application to
    Ithaca College.

39
Module 5 Admissions Enrollment Links to
Review, cont.
  • http//www.browndailyherald.com/stories.asp?storyI
    D570 Informative story on technological glitches
    that can occur in Admissions.
  • http//www.computerworld.com/securitytopics/securi
    ty/privacy/story/0,10801,73472,00.html Story
    about the intersection of technology, admissions
    and ethics.
  • http//www.sctcorp.com/Education/p_b_student.html
    Click on the software demo in the right hand
    columnthe first three steps of the See it in
    Action Link explain the Banner competencies for
    Admissions. Four through ten explain Banners
    interlinks between admissions, financial aid,
    advising and even student portals.

40
Module 5 Admissions Enrollment Activity
(this is an online session)
  • Review the links above. Use your student key to
    download and test out one of the software trial
    versions from the course platform.
  • Search for technologically interactive ideas
    implemented on college campuses that do not rely
    solely on web page view (e.g. touch screen
    kiosks, interactive campus maps, etc.).
  • Use e-networking to discuss with your policy
    group keypals the implications from the fourth
    and fifth links in this weeks syllabus.
  • Participate in the course discussion board to
    post your thoughts about the software programs
    and technologically interactive ideas.

41
Module 5 Admissions Enrollment Learning
Outcomes and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase students technological
    comfort. E-networking with keypals will provide
    expanded exposure to diverse points of view.
  • Admissions will be examined as a facet of the
    Student Affairs profession.
  • Discussion will develop the higher-level thinking
    skill of problem solving (Tileston, 2004) that
    allows for effective decisions about how to
    ethically incorporate technology within various
    Student Affairs professional roles.

42
Module 6 Technology on the Community College
Campus
  • Technology has been instrumental in helping the
    college achieve its mission of putting learning
    first and maintaining enrollment.
  • (Edwards, K., 2003)

43
Module 6 Community Colleges Objectives
  • Explore the impact that technology has had on
    community colleges.
  • Investigate the positive and negative effects of
    technology at two-year colleges.

44
Module 6 Community Colleges Links to Review
  • http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Fall_2003/Impac
    tofTechnology.html A discussion of the positive
    and negative impacts of technology on the
    community colleges campus.
  • http//www.hccs.cc.tx.us/ Explore a centralized
    website for community colleges within the Houston
    Metro area. A good example of one-stop shopping
    for a community member with links to specifics in
    their own area.
  • http//www.sinclair.edu/academics/elhs/departments
    /ebe/cww/index.cfm Sinclair Community College is
    one of the largest in America and addresses
    concerns regarding distance education
    incorporated within its learning curriculum.

45
Module 6 Community Colleges Activity (this is
an in-person session)
  • Before class, investigate the links provided
    above.
  • Attend class to participate in the e-visit to
    three community colleges.
  • Participate in the virtual tours of campuses and
    come prepared with discussion questions for the
    e-panel videoconference that will take place
    during the second half of class.

46
Module 6 Community Colleges Learning
Outcomes and Rationales
  • Active engagement will continue to immerse
    students in the technology they will encounter in
    the field (videoconferencing, e-networking,
    internet searches) to emphasize real-life
    implications of technological advances in Student
    Affairs (Hird, 2000).
  • Use of online research skills coupled with
    e-networking will develop the higher-level
    thinking skill of evaluation (Tileston, 2004)
    that allows for effective decisions on ways to
    incorporate technology within various Student
    Affairs professional roles.
  • Community College virtual tour and e-panel will
    expose students to technological policies,
    activities, and services currently in use within
    one sector of higher education as a benchmark
    from which to evaluate the policy development
    group project.

47
Module 7 Life in CyberlandStudent and
Residence Life in an Asynchronous Environment
  • What will become of the residence hall and its
    learning potential in an asynchronous
    environment?
  • (Upcraft, M.L., Terenzini, P.T.)

48
Module 7 Life in Cyberland Objectives
  • Explore how the internets constant availability
    has transformed residential college communities.
  • Review ways technology has created an effective
    system for addressing administrative tasks while
    meeting the Residential and Student Life needs of
    students.
  • Examine how online administrative tasks,
    policies, and general information have shaped the
    way in which students interact with Residence and
    Student Life offices.

49
Module 7 Life in Cyberland Links to Review
  • http//www.uvm.edu/reslife/ The University of
    Vermont offers a broad array of housing services
    online while also providing links to campus
    policies via the student handbook. Students can
    receive pertinent information regarding meal
    plans and are updated weekly about housing
    events.
  • http//hds.ucsd.edu/roomselection/details.html
    The University of California, San Diego takes
    students step by step through a detailed example
    of their online room selection process.
  • http//facilities.princeton.edu/housing/a_undergra
    duate/2007/2007housing.htm Princeton has
    minimized the amount of postal mailings and
    streamlined orientation to incorporate an
    all-encompassing housing letter.

50
Module 7 Life in Cyberland Activity (this is
an online session)
  • Before class, investigate the links listed above
    and search for links to Student Life sites
    (Multicultural Services, Commuter Student
    Services, International Student Services) for
    exemplary examples of technology use in Student
    Life Offices. Also be in touch via email with a
    student affairs professional in Residence Life or
    Student Life services.
  • Evaluate and weigh whether decreased face-to-face
    interaction through technology as it applies to
    Residence Life and Student Life offices could
    lead to greater attrition or retention of special
    populations such as those served by
    multicultural, commuter, and international
    student services.

51
Module 7 Life in Cyberland Activity, cont.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the week
  • Evaluate how the limited interpersonal
    interactions of an asynchronous environment that
    fosters autonomy and self-sufficiency might help
    or hinder students progression through
    Chickerings third vector as they attempt to
    become interdependent beings (Chickering and
    Reisser, 1993).
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    sharing the results of your search for exemplary
    examples of technology in student services, the
    special population exercise, your e-network
    contacts insights, and your own thoughts on this
    weeks Technology and Theory Intersection. Peer
    review your classmates contributions (Jonassen
    et. al, 2003).

52
Module 7 Life in Cyberland Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase technological comfort of
    students enrolled in this course. E-networking
    will continue to expand students contact bases
    for real-time consultations within their
    professional roles.
  • Residence Life and Student Life (Multicultural
    Services, Commuter Student Services,
    International Student Services) will be
    thoroughly examined as facets of the overall
    Student Affairs profession.
  • Evaluation of student services that go beyond
    websites to incorporate technology will foster
    development of a technological framework and the
    higher-level thinking skills of evaluation
    (Tileston, 2004) that allow for effective
    decisions on the incorporation of technology
    within various Student Affairs roles.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a Student Development theoretical
    framework from which to evaluate the impact of
    technology on Student Affairs within Residence
    Life and Student Services.

53
Module 8 Career ServicesTechnology and
Students Futures
  • Find a great job. Meet the right people. Make
    big things happen for yourself and your career.
  • Monster.com

54
Module 8 Career Services Objectives
  • Explore internet job search functions.
  • Examine resources available for career
    development.
  • Apply student development theory to personal job
    search activities.

55
Module 8 Career Services Links to Review
  • http//www.career.missouri.edu/article.php?sid146
    University of Missouri interactive testing site
    that allows students to explore career options
    based on personality and preferences.
  • http//www.uncwil.edu/stuaff/career/Majors/
    Informative career services and planning site
    that translates educational achievements into
    transferable skills on the job market.
  • http//www.d.umn.edu/student/loon/car/self/career_
    transfer_survey.html Interactive transferable
    skills index useful for students who are trying
    to apply skills to various positions on the job
    market.
  • http//www.getinterviews.com/articles.html
    Articles with tangible reference checking,
    interviewing and resume/cover letter writing tips
    from experts in the field.
  • www.monster.com, www.careerbuilder.com,
    www.higheredjobs.com, www.studentaffairs.com
    Online job search engines.
  • http//www.gse.harvard.edu/cso/
    Institution-specific eRecruiting technology that
    allows students to search postings and post
    resumes in a secure online environment.

56
Module 8 Career Services Activity (this is an
online session)
  • View the links listed above. Conduct an internet
    search for professional associations in any given
    field except for education. Find a geographic
    location-specific organization, a professional,
    and a general umbrella organization within that
    field.
  • Complete a personality type evaluation of your
    choice.
  • Update your resume and cover letter using tips
    provided within the links. Complete the
    transferable skills website checklist and
    incorporate the results into your resume.
  • If you are actively seeking employment, post your
    resume to one of the online job search engines.
    If you are not, post to the course message board
    so that classmates may access your information
    for future networking opportunities.

57
Module 8 Career Services Activity, cont.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the Week
  • Chickerings sixth vector involves developing
    clear vocational goals (Chickering and Reisser,
    1993). Part of this vector is contingent upon
    development of strong interpersonal commitments.
    What are the pitfalls and achievements associated
    with so little interpersonal interaction on the
    ability to develop meaningful commitments to
    others particularly, an employer?
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    posting the associations for the field of your
    choice, your personality type in your chosen
    evaluation, and your updated resume. Also post
    your transferable skills percentages and
    reflections on the Technology and Theory
    Intersection.

58
Module 8 Career Services Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase technological comfort of
    students enrolled in the course.
  • Career planning and counseling will be thoroughly
    examined as facets of the overall Student Affairs
    profession and students will personally interact
    with online career service offerings so as to
    advance their own career goals.
  • Evaluation of student services that go beyond
    websites to incorporate technology will foster
    development of a technological framework and the
    higher-level thinking skills of evaluation,
    comparison and contrast (Tileston, 2004) that
    allow for effective decisions on the
    incorporation of technology within various
    Student Affairs roles.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a Student Development theoretical
    framework from which to evaluate the impact of
    technology on Student Affairs within the area of
    career services.

59
Module 9 Student Activities
  • Students attending brick campuses long
    embraced the complete college experience
    including leadership development, intramurals,
    academic organizations, and social clubs. So, why
    cannot these services be designed to function in
    an online environment?
  • www.studentaffairs.com

60
Module 9 Student Activities Objectives
  • Explore the integration of technology into
    student activities.
  • Evaluate whether student activitiesa unit laden
    with student technological talentis
    technologically more advanced than other Student
    Affairs departments.

61
Module 9 Student Activities Links to Review
  • http//www.vpul.upenn.edu/osl/saos.html
  • www.naca.org
  • http//studentactivities.tamu-commerce.edu/
  • http//www.sao.umn.edu/

62
Module 9 Student Activities Activity (this is
an online session)
  • Review the websites. E-network again with your
    Policy group keypals to discuss the future
    implications of the articles and incorporate
    important future considerations in your policy
    paper.
  • Ponder the following and brainstorm innovative
    student programming opportunities that go beyond
    web site production in creating a technologically
    savvy campus with your group
  • Children growing up with Internet technology are
    no longer satisfied to be passive viewers of
    online documents instead, they expect to do
    something each time they go on the Internet
    (Harel, 1999, p. 19).

63
Module 9 Student Activities Activity, cont.
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    sharing the results of your search for innovative
    service providers, the comparison exercise,
    thoughts brought up with your keypal
    interactions, and your own thoughts and musings
    on the innovative services brainstorming session.
  • Provide a peer review for your classmates
    contributions.

64
Module 9 Student Activities Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Technological immersion provides continued
    technological comfort. E-networking continues to
    allow students to receive substantive exposure to
    various view points.
  • The role of Student Activities will be examined
    within the Student Affairs profession.
  • Brainstorming exercise will provide students with
    an opportunity to apply theory and evaluate the
    impact of technology on Student Development.

65
Module 10 Technology in Public and Private
4-Year Institutions
  • Technology has been instrumental in helping the
    college achieve its mission of putting learning
    first and maintaining enrollment.
  • (Edwards, K., 2003)

66
Module 10 Public Private Objectives
  • Explore innovative technology at four-year
    institutions.
  • Investigate the positive and negative effects of
    technology on demographically diverse college
    campuses.

67
Module 10 Public Private Links to Review
  • http//chronicle.com/infotech/ Chronicle of
    Higher Educations Information Technology
    website.
  • www.internet2.edu Consortium of 200 educational
    institutions with discussion on implications for
    interconnectivity of campuses.

68
Module 10 Public Private Activity (this is
an in-person session)
  • Review all class material from the first nine
    weeks, the links provided above, and scan the
    course message board for potential policy issues
    that can be explored and exploited with the panel
    for use in your policy paper.
  • In the classroom, actively participate in the
    e-visit to three four-year campuses.
  • Participate in the virtual tours of the campuses
    and come prepared with discussion questions for
    the e-panel videoconference.

69
Module 10 Public Private Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Active engagement will continue to immerse
    students in the technology they will encounter in
    the field (videoconferencing, e-networking,
    internet searches) to emphasize real-life
    implications of technological advances in Student
    Affairs (Hird, 2000).
  • E-networking coupled with in-class debate as to
    the merits of technology on various campuses will
    develop the higher-level thinking skills of
    evaluation and compare and contrast (Tileston,
    2004) that allow for effective decisions on how
    to incorporate technology within various Student
    Affairs professional roles on four year campuses.
  • Four-year college virtual tour and e-panel will
    expose students to technological policies,
    activities, and services currently in use within
    one sector of higher education as a benchmark
    from which to evaluate policy development group
    project.

70
Module 11 Beyond the CampusStudent Services
for Distance Learners
  • Learning is strongly affected by the educational
    climate in which it takes place the settings and
    surroundings, the influences of others, and the
    values accorded to the life of the mind and to
    learning achievements.
  • (American Association for Higher Education,
    American College Personnel Association, and
    National
  • Association of Student Personnel Administrators,
    1998)

71
Module 11 Beyond the Campus Objectives
  • Examine the pros and cons of a self-contained
    online college campus.
  • Evaluate whether the convenience of distance
    learning has hampered the effectiveness of
    Student Affairs practitioners to incorporate the
    holistic education of the entire student.
  • Explore technological applications and policies
    geared toward distance learners and their
    implications.

72
Module 11 Beyond the Campus Links to Review
  • http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Spring_2001/pol
    icy.htmlAAHE An important discussion about why
    student affairs professionals need to recognize
    the distance learning initaive.
  • http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Summer_2000/art
    10.html Discussion of the pros and cons of
    distance learning. Students satisfaction is
    considered, along with feedback regarding
    engagement and the overall experience.
    http//www.petersons.com/distancelearning/default.
    asp Basic introduction to long distance learning
    via the internet with an exploration of various
    options, courses, and programs.

73
Module 11 Beyond the Campus Links to Review,
cont.
  • http//www.registrar.northwestern.edu/directory/em
    ail.html, http//www.fpd.finop.umn.edu/groups/ppd/
    documents/policy/Email_Pol.cfm,
    http//www.rochester.edu/Eastman/registrar/handboo
    k/gen_policy11.htm Northwestern Universitys,
    University of Minnesotas, and University of
    Rochesters Eastman School of Music email
    correspondence policies.
  • http//www.nacada.ksu.edu/InterestGroups/C23/index
    .htm Contact information for NACADAs Distance
    Advising Interest Group.
  • http//www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/Advising_I
    ssues/adv_distance.htm Considerations for student
    services when working with distance learners.

74
Module 11 Beyond the Campus Activity (this
is an online session)
  • Review the sites listed above. Explore
    non-website, technological approaches to distance
    learning interactions on campus.
  • Intersection of Technology and Theory of the
    Week
  • Beyond his vectors, Chickering asserts that
    environment impacts student development
    (Chickering and Reisser, 1993). Contrast how
    Chickerings seven environmental factors effect
    fully detached distance learners as compared to
    the same factors on partially immersed,
    tech-savvy, residential and commuter students.
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    sharing the results of your search for non-web
    based distance learning interactions, and your
    thoughts about this weeks Technology and Theory
    Intersection.

75
Module 11 Beyond the Campus Learning
Outcomes and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase the technological comfort of
    students enrolled in the course.
  • A special population served by Student Affairs
    will be examined to prepare Student Affairs
    pre-professionals for the challenges of serving
    students who are completely detached from the
    campus.
  • Evaluation of student services that goes beyond
    websites to incorporate technology will foster
    development of a technological framework and the
    higher-level thinking skills of evaluation
    (Tileston, 2004) that allow for effective
    decisions on the incorporation of technology
    within various Student Affairs roles.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a Student Development theoretical
    framework from which to evaluate the impact of
    technology on Student Affairs and distance
    learning.

76
Module 12 Technological Concerns in Student
Affairs
  • Advisors play a critical role. They can ask a
    broad array of questions, and make a few
    suggestions, that can affect a student in a broad
    and profound way.
  • (Light, 2001)

77
Module 12 Tech Concerns Objectives
  • Debate the effects of the paradigm shift in
    Student Affairs from direct to indirect
    intervention with the advent of technology.
  • Discuss how immediate student interaction can be
    maintained in a detached, asynchronous
    environment.

78
Module 12 Tech Concerns Links to Review
  • http//www.acpa.nche.edu/seniorscholars/trends/tre
    nds5.htm A powerful article discussing the fears
    that student affairs practitioners are currently
    in contention over.
  • http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Fall_2002/stude
    ntconflicts.htm A concrete example of how student
    affairs can create programs that incorporate
    technology, while maintaining traditions of
    mediation and direct relationships with students.
  • http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Winter_2002/deb
    ate.html A point/counter-point article relating
    the pros and cons of the inter-connectedness of
    the campus college experience via technology.

79
Module 12 Tech Concerns Activity (this is an
online session)
  • Review the websites listed above. E-network again
    with your policy group keypals to discuss the
    future implications of the articles and
    incorporate important future considerations in
    your policy paper.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the Week
  • In the fifth vector, Chickering reasons that
    identity development is partially driven by a
    clear self concept (Chickering and Reisser,
    1993). However, Pamela Perry notes that an
    individual cannot have a sense of self without
    experiencing an other (Perry, 2002). Evaluate
    how a paradigm shift away from proximate
    interactions, toward disconnection, would or
    would not impact a student seeking an other to
    compare or identify with.

80
Module 12 Tech Concerns Activity, cont.
  • Participate in the online discussion board by
    sharing ideas from your keypal interactions and
    your thoughts about this weeks Technology and
    Theory Intersection.
  • Peer review your classmates contributions.

81
Module 12 Tech Concerns Learning Outcomes and
Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase students technological
    comfort. E-networking will continue to allow
    students to receive substantive exposure to
    various view points.
  • Drawback and concerns to the impact on
    traditional student services will be examined as
    issues debated within the Student Affairs
    profession.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a theoretical framework from which
    to evaluate the impact of technology on Student
    Development.

82
Module 13 Avoiding Further Disadvantage
Disability Services Online
  • As colleges and universities increase their
    reliance on online offerings, Universal Design
    features should be built in. From a practical
    perspective, the effort required to retrofit
    thousands of web pages to upgrade their
    accessibility is not only daunting but
    startlingly inefficient, especially when the
    techniques and tools to insure compliance are so
    readily available.

83
Module 13 Avoiding Further Disadvantage
Objectives
  • Explore Disability Services within the context of
    Student Affairs.
  • Investigate technological options for serving
    students with diverse needs while avoiding
    further disenfranchisement.
  • Analyze concerns and disadvantages of reducing
    the quantity of interpersonal interactions in
    disability services when quality remains constant.

84
Module 13 Avoiding Further Disadvantage Links
to Review
  • http//www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm
    Government link to the Americans with
    Disabilities Act.
  • http//www.disability.vic.gov.au/dsonline/dssubmit
    .nsf/PresentLinks?OpenAgentsStudents_with_a_Disa
    bility A specific site describing Victorias
    services for students with disabilities with a
    link back to the Disabilities Online
    metacollection of online materials.
  • http//www.umuc.edu/distance/odell/cade/ade/ud/lea
    rning.html Another site for serving students with
    disabilities with specific attention paid to
    distance education.
  • http//cap.umn.edu/ University of Minnesota
    Computer Accommodations Program provides
    assistance to students needing special
    coordination or technological equipment.
  • http//www.makoa.org/education.htm A metasource
    with extensive information on educational
    opportunities, financial aid, books and many
    sources available to students with disabilities
    and the professionals who work with them.

85
Module 13 Avoiding Further Disadvantage
Activity (this is an online session)
  • View the Disability Services websites listed
    above.
  • With your policy group keypals, e-network to
    discuss ways internet technology might be
    inefficient in Disability Services and suggest
    alternate technologically advanced approaches to
    Disability Services.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection of the Week
  • Revisit Chickerings first vector of competency
    development (Chickering and Reisser, 1993) and
    contrast how technological advances might be more
    (or less) beneficial to students with
    disabilities than to the general student
    population in regards to physical/manual,
    intellectual and interpersonal competency
    development.
  • Use the remainder of the week to wrap up policy
    papers and have at least one member of your group
    meet with the professor (an e-visit is sufficient
    though office visits are also appropriate) to
    finalize your Symposium presentation format.

86
Module 13 Avoiding Further Disadvantage
Learning Outcomes and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via online format will
    continue to increase students technological
    comfort. E-networking will continue to expand
    students contact bases for real-time
    consultations within their professional roles.
  • Student Disability Services will be examined as a
    facet of the Student Affairs profession.
  • Comparisons of the impact of technology on
    various student groups will develop the
    higher-level thinking skills of comparison and
    contrast (Tileston, 2004) that allow for
    effective decisions on how to incorporate
    technology within various Student Affairs
    professional roles.
  • Technology and Theory Intersection will provide
    students with a theoretical framework from which
    to evaluate the impact of technology on Student
    Development.

87
Module 14 Policy Symposium
  • Students will expect to leave their graduate
    programs with the knowledge, skills, and
    competencies required to use technology in
    developing and improving the quality of student
    affairs programs and services.
  • (Engstrom, C.M., 1997)

88
Module 14 Policy Symposium Objectives
  • Conclude Technology in Student Affairs course
    with conference about the intersection of
    technology and student development theory as
    applied to policy considerations in Student
    Affairs.
  • Explore innovative technology via participation
    in a multi-site Symposium with e-visitations,
    e-tours and interactive question and answer
    sessions possible through linkage of each
    consortium site through a multi-user
    teleconference.

89
Module 14 Policy Symposium Activity (this is
an in-person session)
  • Post your groups policy paper to the course
    discussion board and review copies of all papers
    before coming to class.
  • Participate in the Policy Symposium virtual
    discussion session in class and submit peer
    review grades for the course.
  • Participate in the virtual discussion sessions on
    each paper via the in-class teleconference.

90
Module 14 Policy Symposium Learning Outcomes
and Rationales
  • Technological immersion via virtual conference
    across consortium members with students present
    at individual sites will allow for
    technologically advanced collaboration, rather
    than competition (Langenberg and Spicer, 2001).
  • E-conference will expand students knowledge base
    regarding technologys impact on specific Student
    Affairs function areas within the confines of
    student development theory. Class will conclude
    with e-appearances by Student Affairs
    professionals on a panel that will judge
    creativity, practicality, and student development
    theory applications for compilation of a
    web-published Thoughts on Theory for the Coming
    Year report. All papers will be ranked within
    these categories by the panel and by the students
    within the class the paper was presented from.
  • Final grades will be based on the grade rubric.

91
Grading RubricPossible points per category are
listed in parentheses
Doesnt meet expectations Meets expectations Exceeds expectations
Class participation 40 (graded by instructor) Student missed 3 classes (did not complete online modules or missed in-class modules) (0-10 points) Student was present, completed assignments on time (11-20 points) Student was present and took time to meet with others outside of class times creative and innovative completion of assignments (21-40 points)
92
Grading Rubric, cont.Possible points per
category are listed in parentheses
Doesnt meet expectations Meets expectations Exceeds expectations
Peer review 40 (graded by students) Student was disrespectful, inconsiderate, did not participate as keypal or share insights (0-10 points) Student was respectful, supplied opinions, reasonably responded to e-network requests (11-20 points) Student was engaging, thought provoking, willing to extensively e-network, creative and innovative in approach to helping others successfully complete course (21-40 points)
93
Grading Rubric, cont.Possible points per
category are listed in parentheses
Doesnt meet expectations Meets expectations Exceeds expectations
Final Paper 20 (Panel 10, Class 10) Paper did not incorporate theory, address various student affairs units, or give serious consideration to technological impacts. (0-10 points) Paper incorporated student development theories, examined various units within student affairs, considered technology in historic, current, and futuristic contexts. (11-20 points) Paper incorporated theories, examined all student affairs units discussed in class, and, perhaps those areas not covered in the course considered impact of technology from various time points, exhibits creative and/or critical thought in real-time application considerations. (21-40 points)
94
Resources Used
  • American Association for Higher Education,
    American College Personnel Association, and
    NationalAssociation of Student Personnel
    Administrators. (1998). Powerful partnerships A
    shared responsibility for learning. From the
    World Wide Web http//www.aahe.org/assessment/joi
    nt.htm
  • Beck, S. (1997). Suggestions for successful
    internet assignments. The good, the bad the
    ugly Or, why its a good idea to evaluate web
    sources. From the World Wide Web
    http//lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/evalsugg.html
  • Chickering, A.W., and Reisser, L. (1993).
    Education and identity (2nd ed.). San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.
  • Cornford, J., and Pollock, N. (2003). Putting the
    university online Information, technology and
    organizational change. Philadelphia, PA Open
    University Press.
  • Edwards, K. (2003). Impact of technology on
    college recruitment and retention. From the World
    Wide Web http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Fall_
    2003/ImpactofTechnology.html Engstrom, C.M.
    (1997). Integrating information technology into
    student affairs graduate programs, in Using
    technology to promote student learning
    Opportunities for today and tomorrow. San
    Francisco Jossey-Bass
  • Harel, I. (1999). Clickerati kids Who are they?
    In A. Hird, Learning from cyber-savvy students
    How internet-age kids impact classroom teaching.
    (p. 19). Sterling, VirginiaStylus Publishing,
    LLC.
  • Hird, A. (2000). Learning from cyber-savvy
    students How internet-age kids impact classroom
    teaching. Sterling, VA Stylus Printing, LLC.
  • Holland, J. L. (1992). Making vocational choices
    A theory of vocational personalities and work
    environments (2nd ed.). Odessa, FL Psychological
    Assessment Resources.

95
Resources Used, cont.
  • Jonassen, D.H., Howland, J., Moore, J., and
    Marra, R.M. (2003). Learning to solve problems
    with technology A constructivist perspective.
    Upper Saddle River, NJ Pearson Education, Inc.
  • Tileston, D.W. (2004). What Every Teacher Should
    Know About Media and Technology. Thousand Oaks,
    CA Corwin Press
  • Jung, C.G. (1960). The structure and dynamics of
    the psyche. New York Bollingen Foundation.
  • Langenberg, D.N., and Spicer, D.N. (2001). The
    Modern Campus. In G. R. Maughan (2001).
    Technology Leadership Information systems in
    higher education. (pp. 3 16). San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.
  • Light, R., (2001). Making the most of college.
    Harvard University Press. p. 84.
  • Parsons, A., and Hernandez, J., (2003). Creating
    student centered web pages for incoming and new
    students. From the World Wide Web
    http//studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Winter_2003/cre
    atingwebpages.html
  • Treur, P., and Belote, L. (1997). Current and
    emerging applications of technology to promote
    student involvement and learning. In Engstrom,
    C. M and Kruger, K.W. (eds.) (p. 17-30). San
    Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Upcraft, M.L., and Goldsmith, __H. (2000).
    Technological changes in student affairs
    administration
  • Upcraft, M.L., Terenzini, K.K. Looking beyond the
    horizon Trends shaping student affairs
    Technology. From the World Wide Web
    http//www.acpa.nche.edu/seniorscholars/trends/tre
    nds5.htm
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